In Between by Clelia Albano, translated by Peter O’Neill

In Between   

Sebbene la forza gravitazionale 

tenga i miei piedi per terra

ed io viva lo stesso tempo 

nel buio e nella luce, senza

accorgermi della rivoluzione 

del pianeta più umiliato

dall’uomo. Sebbene anche io

appartenga alla sua specie, 

nata da una frattura di Pangea

o da una scheggia di meteorite – 

non so- o proveniente dalla linea

di quel Darwin 

– Non so.

Sebbene io abbia le ore contate 

dal sistema, in mesi dai nomi

coniati da facce ormai perse

dove si celebrano anche donne

che la loro stessa follia arse.

Sebbene io respiri la stessa aria, 

veda lo stesso Sole, non sono

più io nella mia dimensione che

tu non decidi, quando scrivo

sulla pagina bianca o butto giù 

versi su un notebook anonimo 

o quando rendo il mio corpo

leggero aggrappandomi ad un

cavalletto che chissà perché 

volli di legno inglese. E non 

sono io, quell’io costruito da

altri, mentre parole ispirate 

da lontano e mani impastate 

di attimi pigmentati mi fanno 

attraversare l’abisso tra il

presente e l’attimo prima 

di ciò che sta per arrivare. 

In Between

You know, the pull of gravity holds my feet too to the earth

And I live in the same time as the darkness and the light,

Without being duped by the revolution of the planets,

And yet I am more humiliated than Man.

You know, even I am part of the same species as you,

Born on a fragment of Pangea before the continental drift,

Or from a splinter from some meteor whose provenance 

Is unknown, possibly stemming from Darwin. Who knows!

You know, I too live in the hours counting the system,

In the months of whose names I know the faces, 

Although missing are the ones celebrated,

Those women whose madness has so long since been eclipsed.

You know, I too breathe the same air, see the same Sun,

Although I have no longer the same dimensions

Which you used to decide.

When I write upon these white pages,

Or scribble verse there in some anonymous notebook,

Or when I offer up my weightless body,

Clutch a foal that knows when English woods fall…

I am not like those who are made by others,

Putting down words which are inspired by afar.

Rather these self-same hands which knead the pigment 

And which helps me to traverse the abyss

To the eternal present, was saved in that first act

 And which I made in order to first arrive. 

In Between by Clelia Albano, translated by Peter O'Neill

Clelia Albano is the author of Come Tutte Le Cose Di Questi Mondo, In Assenza di Nauffragi and Memorie da Web. She is multi-lingual, speaking along with her native Italian, French, Russian, English and she also has Latin.

About the contributor

Clelia Albano is the author of Come Tutte Le Cose Di Questi Mondo, In Assenza di Nauffragi and Memorie da Web. She is multi-lingual, speaking along with her native Italian, French, Russian, English and she also has Latin.

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