Hurly-Burly – Kathleen Holliday


Hurly-Burly


Oh, I wish we were three again:
Phyllis and her daughters,
sitting around that kitchen table,
steam from our coffee cups 
braiding up with our cigarette smoke
to the ceiling,


Oh, I wish we were there again
in that little blue and white house
with the lace curtain over the window
cut from my sister’s wedding dress,
after the divorce,


for her to scratch off a lotto ticket —
winning just enough for a new muffler
for the undead Dodge parked outside.


For her to lean in, over the 
salt and pepper shakers, 
a conspirator once more, to say,
“When shall we three meet again?”


For her daughters to catch her eye,
for us to cackle like hell.


Of this I’m sure: we’ll meet again, 
when this hurly-burly’s done.



About the contributor

Kathleen Holliday lives on an island in the Salish Sea. Her writing appears or is forthcoming in The Bellingham Review, The Blue Nib Literary Magazine, Cathexis Northwest Press, Common Ground Review, Poetry Super Highway, and SHARK REEF, a Literary Magazine. She is a graduate of Augsburg University, Minneapolis and an erstwhile student of the Lyle’s Bar School of Poetry. She is at work on her first full-length poetry collection.

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