Issue 39 | Sept 2019 |

Lunch Poem- Alec Solomita

Alec Solomita was shortlisted by the Bridport Prize and Southword Journal, and named a finalist by the Noctua Review.

John Huey- Flight

Flight I have been rowed across the Volga and seen the sun breach the waters. Gone in the mist in Delhi late at...

Amphibian and other poems- Cheryl Caesar

Amphibian Post-MS, my legs are clumsy, half-numb. Dumb to earth’s unevenness, I stumble to the shore. Half-in the water is hardest. Currents pull,...

Jade Riordan- Poetry

Jade Riordan is an Irish-Canadian poet, an undergraduate student, and a selection committee member (poetry reader) with Bywords.

To My About-To-Be-Ex-Therapist- Poetry by Caolyn Martin

Carolyn Martin is the poetry editor of Kosmos Quarterly: journal for global transformation.

Grant Guy, Poetry

Grant Guy is a Canadian, writer, illustrator and puppeteer. Currently he is the artistic director of the Circus of Objects.

Grandpa’s Bib Overalls by Michael Lewis Beck

Mike Lewis-Beck works and writes in Iowa City. He has pieces in Alexandria Quarterly, Apalachee Review, Big Windows Review, Cortland Review, Chariton Review, Guesthouse, Pure Slush.

Systematics and other Poems- Gary Glauber

Gary Glauber is a widely published poet, fiction writer, teacher, and former music journalist.

Eros by J.P Mayer

JP Mayer is an emerging writer and a current senior at Brown University, where he studies classics and literary arts.

Zither Music – Short fiction by David Butler

We’d been to the Gate to watch Barry McGovern do his Beckett thing. A character whose proportions might’ve been dreamed up by Alberto Giacometti....

Always Say by Kate Ladew

Kate LaDew is a graduate from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro with a BA in Studio Art. She resides in Graham, North Carolina.

Bait – historical short fiction by Zuri McWhorter

It was my fault. Mama always said, “Don’t leave the baby alone. Night time is pretty to look at, but don’t you go out...

I Have Never – Short Fiction by Elizabeth McGeown

Elizabeth McGeown's first e-pamphlet ''twas' was e-published by Pen Points Press in December 2018.

One hundred knots – Featured Fiction by Kelli Allen

Kelli Allen’s is the recipient of the 2018 Magpie Award for Poetry. Her newest collection is Banjo’s Inside Coyote, C&R Press, 2019.

Person of the Year – Fiction by Tobias Radloff

Tobias Radloff was awarded the Daniil Pashkoff Prize for his short story "Nobody loves you like I do".

Ruler of the Roost -Short Fiction by Rachael Murphy

I stole a hen. Not a nice hen. Oh no! Not a cute hen, not a posh hen. A pure useless brown hen. Scrawny....

Cacophony – Featured Author Roisin Maguire

Everyone knows exactly where they were when the little girl died. It was a momentary intake of breath, the news.

Understanding Rupi Kaur’s Milk and Honey. By Ada Wofford

Understanding Rupi Kaur’s Milk and Honey - by Ada Wofford

Sharp Hills by Chrissie Gittins – Reviewed

Sharp Hills by Chrissie Gittins - Reviewed by Ada Wofford. Along with being a Contributing Editor to the Blue Nib, Ada Wofford is bravely avoiding her inevitable 9-5 enslavement by studying library science at UW-Madison. She holds a BA in English literature and has been published in number of journals.

Peadar O’Donoghue The Death of Poetry -Reviewed

Marie-Louise Eyres reviews Peader O'Donoghue's The Death of Poetry for The Blue Nib. Marie-Louise is a poet who has been writing since 1997. Recently short/long listed for the Bridport, Mslexia and inaugural Brotherton Prizes, her poems appear widely in UK and US journals. In previous lives she was an actress, a literary agent, and a BBC cardigan-wearing executive.

A Long Way from Home. Fiction by Reddaway

Lily hugged her bundle close to her chest.  The lane was crowded, and she was being jostled and pushed.  If she wasn’t careful it...

Appreciating the Whole: A Look into the Form and Meaning of That They May Face the Rising Sun

The title of That They May Face the Rising Sun is essential in understanding the work. When the men are burying Johnny, Patrick Ryan asks, “Does it make a great difference that his head lie in the west?” To which, he himself eventually, and somewhat ironically, answers, “He sleeps with his head in the west…so that when he wakes he may face the rising sun.”

How A Writer Finds Inspiration Among Her Clutter And Elsewhere

How a Writer Finds Inspiration   Your storage level is almost full! Stuff, I’ve got loads of it: stuff in boxes, stuff in bags, stuff in files,...

New Poetry from Hennessy awards nominee James Finnegan

STYX AND STONESa Clare born priest-poet and philosopher advises     that one be consoled by      and sure about           one’s own...

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