Absence Yvonne Brewer


Absence.


Black wide-winged raven staring down
at a white feather trying to reach sandy ground.
No hag stone in sight. Sea gull cries in flight.


The clouds have seized the lighthouse,
making an empty horizon hang 
an absence on blank canvas.


An island has been painted over by grey skies
that have the last laugh. The moon without a crescent, 
cannot wax or wane to half.

About the contributor

Yvonne Brewer lives in Cork, Ireland and has had poetry published since 2014 including with The Blue Nib in 2017 and 2018. Her first poetry book released in October 2018 is available to buy on Amazon. 'Twigs' is a collection of poems based on the simple but extra ordinary mindful moments of everyday life combining motherhood with nature and reflecting spiritual themes that take the reader on a journey to the soul.

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