A poem by Doreena Jennings

Childhood Reflection

Would I risk walking down the avenue

of childhood. Past the cherry blossoms, 

the laburnum fallen over when a storm blew

that drew strength to re-root and bloom again,

sit quietly on its woven branches,

curtaining myself behind golden chains,

rake new paths on the lawn from leaf piles,

before the gardener cleared what remained.

I would gladly trade all this privilege

to find safe hands clasped, above the mud

to give me a leg-up, to bridge the gap

to the first big branch of the redwood,

from where I could re-imagine this small

life re-shaped, re-cast entirely differently.

About the contributor

Doreena Jennings is a member of the award winning ‘Carlow Writers Co-op’. She has contributed to many local anthologies. She enjoys performing her work and has delivered it to audiences in Chicago, Sweden, Wales, Dublin, Wexford and Carlow. Currently finishing her debut collection she is undaunted by dyslexia and dyspraxia and is determined to be a published author of merit

Related Articles

4 poems by Emily Bilman

Emily Bilman’s three poetry books are, A Woman By A Well (2015), Resilience (2015), and The Threshold of Broken Waters (2018) all published by Troubador Books

Featured Poet, Nicola Harrison

Nicola Harrison is the critically acclaimed author of: The Wordsmith’s Guide.

4 poems by Abigail Elizabeth Ottley

Abigail Elizabeth Ottley is a former English teacher whose poetry and fiction are widely published

More Like This

Poetry by Colin Bancroft

Colin Bancroft won the 2016 Poets and Players Prize. His pamphlet Impermanence is out in October 2020 with Maytree Press.

Poetry by Marjory Woodfield

In this set of poem, Marjory Woodfield takes inspiration from travel.

‘Kintyre’ a poem by Carol McKay

Carol McKay won the Robert Louis Stevenson Fellowship in 2010

‘Recordings’ a poem by Claire Basarich

Claire Basarich’s first collection was short listed for the Live Canon 2019 pamphlet competition. 

Clara Burghelea Editorial Issue 41

Poetry Selected by Clara Burghelea and Tracy Gaughan Editorial  In a world of objects, poetry allows us to inhabit endless skins, in the reading and rereading...