11 Short story contests you’re not too late to enter

Short story contests

Manchester Fiction Prize
A major international short story contest that is open to anyone aged 16 or over. The winner receives a cash prize of £10,000 (US$11,500). Stories up to 2500 words. Entry fee is £17.50. Close on 20 September.

Zoetrope All-Story’s Annual Fiction Contest
One of theose Short Story Contests that seeks out and encourages talented writers. Winner and runners-up’s have their work forwarded to leading literary agents. Prize is $1000. Closes 1 October.

F(r)iction’s Fiction Contest
Short Story Contests run the imprint of the Brink Literacy Project that encourage submissions that push boundaries. Entries between 1000 and 7500 words. The judge is novelist Melanie Finn. The winner will receive $1000 and publication. Entry fee is $15. Entries close on 31 July.

John Steinbeck Short Story Award
Run by Reed Magazine. Entries upto 5000 words. Prize of US$1000 and all entries considered for publication. Closes 1 November.

Indiana Review’s Half-K Prize
First prize of US$1000 and publication. Submit up to three pieces of 500 words each. No genre or form restrictions. Entry fee is $20 and as a bonus you get a one-year subscription to Indiana Review. Close on 15 August.

Ruth Rendell Short Story Competition
For short fiction up to 1000 words. Run by InterAct Stroke Support which is a charity that offers supports stroke recovery, using professional actors to deliver reading material to stroke patients. Judge is Margaret Drabble. Winer gets £1000 and is commisioned to write four more stories for the charity. Entry fee £15. Close 2 December.

Larry Brown Short Story Award
Short Story Contests run by Pithead Chapel Literary Magazine. Enter up to 4000 words for judge, novelist Leesa Cross-Smith. Entry fee US$10. Closes 31 October.

Commonwealth Short Story Prize
Open to Commonwealth countries only. 2000- 5000 words. The overall winner receives £5000 (US$6500) and four regional winners receive £2500. Entries close in November.

Bayou Magazine’s James Knudsen Prize for Fiction
For unpublished work up to 7500 words. Can include Novel Excepts. Winner gets $1000. All submissions considered for publication. Entry $20 Closes 31 December.

Magic Oxygen Literary Competition
Short stories up to 4000 words. Prize £1000. And the organisers will plant a tree in Kenya for each entry received. Entry fee £5. Closse on 31 December.

Chris O’Malley Prize in Fiction
Run by The Madison Review. Winner gets US$1000 and publication. Entries of up to to 30 pages. Entry fee TBC. Entries open in October and close on 1 December.

Short story contests.

The Blue Nib Chapbook Contest will be back in September, in the meantime, try your hand at one of these.

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